Very, very cool: A writer shares insight from the Arctic Circle Summer Solstice program

On Sunday, March 17, AS IF Center writer in residence Cynthia Reeves generously shared her time, expertise, and passion for writing with the Toe River Arts community, by way of two events – a workshop in using science research in writing fiction, and a talk about her experience in the Arctic Circle Summer Solstice Expedition.

For the three-hour workshop called Making the Leap from Fact to Fiction, Cynthia prepared readings, gave writing assignments, and offered expert writing guidance to nine workshop attendees, three of whom traveled from Asheville in order to participate. Cynthia challenged workshop participants to think about character development and point of view while weaving science facts into the writing.


Following the workshop, in a talk entitled Of Ice Floes, Whale Bones, and Abandoned Mines: Close Encounters from the Arctic Circle Summer Solstice Expedition,  Cynthia regaled us with tales of her adventures to the Svalbard archipelago in the Arctic. She took us to abandoned coal mines taken over by noisy flocks of Kittiwakes, shared grief for a beach piled with remnant whale bones from the archipelago’s heyday as a whaling center,  and concluded with this arrestingly beautiful short video of a calving glacier, filmed by fellow resident artist/ shipmate Adam Laity. 

As we shook off the winter chill and yearned for spring, we were reminded of melting glaciers and other meteorological dramas unfolding on remote parts of our planet. Thank you, Cynthia, for sharing your writing insight and Arctic adventures with our community.

These two events were brought the Toe River Arts community through a partnership with AS IF Center and Toe River Arts Center. We are grateful to TRAC for offering their space and helping us host these two events.  




In My Backyard


An art-science talk by Kristen Orr and Kate Fleming

This event is co-sponsored by AS IF Center and Toe River Arts and is free of charge.

Artists Kristen Orr and Kate Fleming will be in residence at AS IF Center for two weeks this April. They will give an art-science talk titled “In My Backyard” at the Arts Resource Center on May 5 from 11am-12pm.

During their residency, Kristen and Kate will be creating a series of prints based on an artistic and scientific research trip they took across North Carolina in May 2017. The artists spent a week visiting seven nature preserves, each within a distinct ecoregion of the state—Roan Mountain, Linville Gorge, Uwharrie National Forest, Weymouth Woods, Green Swamp, Black River, and Carolina Beach State Park. They documented the species, colors, textures, sounds, and smells of each location using a variety of artistic and scientific methods. Using the data they collected on their trip, they are collaborating to create imagery that is representative of each location.

At the talk on May 5 at the ARC, the artists will share stories from their epic road trip across the state and describe how they used artistic and scientific methods to capture the essence of an ecosystem. Their collected visual data, including notes, sketches, paintings, color swatches, pressed plants, soil samples, and field recording will also be on display.






Kristen and Kate are working on their project with scientific guidance from Dr. Peter Weigl, an ecologist at Wake Forest University and from The Nature Conservancy of North Carolina.

Kristen is a multimedia artist and designer from Winston-Salem, NC. She currently works as an exhibit designer for the Museum of Science, Boston and holds a BFA in Industrial Design from the Rhode Island School of Design. Kate is a painter and printmaker based in Arlington, Virginia. She works as an exhibit specialist at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC and graduated from the College of William and Mary. 

For more information about the May 5 talk, visit the Upcoming Events page.

Interview: Ingrid Erickson

During Penland’s Winter Residency, I had a chance to catch up with Ingrid Erickson, a mixed media artist who specializes in cut paper. She often includes scientifically accurate images of birds, bones, and other natural history subjects. Ingrid has had several opportunities to install herself as a sort of “artist in residence” among several scientific groups, something which I have done as well. We had a chat at the Penland Coffee Shop in January.

NL: I’d like to talk with you about the ways in which you insert yourself as a sort of artist in residence working in the lab or in the field among scientists, and what that process is like. I’ve done that a few times and it’s really interesting.
IE: I’ve just found scientists to be really welcoming in general, once they understand I have a certain seriousness about the topic and that we’re approaching it from a very, very different set of lenses. I’ve found people to be really welcoming and supportive.

NL: So when we talked before you were saying you’ve been working Prairie Ridge. Can you tell me more about that?
IE: I have data from the last twelve years from Prairie Ridge Ecostation and I’m doing a project about bird banding, an installation piece, it will be large scale involving paper infusions and an actual ornithologists mist net. I went there several times to observe bird banding, and also went to the National Bird Banding Laboratory, an office at Patuxent [Wildlife Research Center] in Maryland.

NL: What did you do at Patuxent?
IE: I was there for three weeks and I was actually a member of the Crane Team. So I was working with eight scientists primarily, raising endangered Whooping Crane babies.
NL: That’s so cool. You got to actually participate in it as one of the researchers?
IE: Yes. Every morning there would be a team meeting and then people would suit up and you’d have to wear your costume, which is a head-to-foot white outfit with mesh screens so you can see, but your face is not visible. You have a puppet on your hand to feed the chicks, and you’re teaching them to eat and drink as they grow.

NL: So were you working mostly with postdocs and graduate students? Who are the folks that are on this team? Are they volunteers?
IE: There are some volunteers. It’s a really interesting interface. There are volunteers from the community who’ve been helping out for years and years, there are graduate students, there are scientists who’ve been working there for the past 20 years or so and they all know each other, so it’s sort of an interesting community.

NL: How did you get involved with that? I mean did you sort of write somebody and say, can I come join you?
IE: When I decided I wanted to do this piece on cranes, I found out there is an International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, Wisconsin that’s involved in research and conservation and then there’s also a team of biologists who meets every three to four years for a conference, and so I went.
NL: Where was that?
IE: It was in Chattanooga, Tennessee. There were about 300 scientists there, and then me, the lone official artist.

NL: When you first started doing this kind of work, did you reach out to a specific scientist whose work you were interested in? What was your first step towards this sort of partnership?
IE: Well, for this particular project, I went and I heard all their papers and I talked with people about their research, and then identified people I might like to work with. I found some folks who were receptive to the idea of an artist collaborating. So that’s how I found out about going to Patuxent and doing some work at the vet hospital there, and also met some wildlife biologists in Mississippi and Louisiana, folks from the Calgary Zoo… it’s a really big operation.

NL: So when you first approach them are you showing them examples of your work?
IE: Yes.
NL: What appeals to me about your work, both as an artist and a scientist, is that I look at these species of birds and they are identifiable, it’s almost like scientific illustration using cut paper. So they were taking you seriously because you’re taking the science seriously?
IE: Yes, absolutely. The specific reference point is that I’m interested in a particular species and the ecosystem that it’s involved in and the role that it plays, why it’s important.

NL: Are you weaving other things like that into the work somehow? Do the background patterns have something to do with environmental information?
IE: Yes. In some of my older work, there are architectural references that I’ve developed but in the newer work I’ll include numbers sometimes.
NL: Representing what?
IE: Specific data points that have to do with the project. For instance, I decided I wanted to include some of the costume-wearing puppets, so I have 186 of these individual paper cuts that are part of the installation, and some of them are eggs. I got to watch the whole incubation process and see how they number them and how they clean them. It’s really complicated and intriguing to me. They sterilize the egg before it’s put in the incubator so it won’t contaminate any of the others. They collect it in a cooler and transport it.
NL: So when you were there, there were cranes at lots of different stages? Egg, newly hatched ones, older ones…
IE: Yes
NL: Is there a breeding season?
IE: The breeding season starts in January and then there is hatching going on throughout May, so it’s the beginning of May when all of that kicks into high gear.

NL: What’s next for you?
IE: I’m doing a project with the Duke Lemur Center and I got a grant for some video equipment which I am really excited about. I don’t have a background in video or anything like that.
NL: Do you have a background in lemurs?
IE: [laughs] No! But I’m going to be gathering a lot of visual information, filming some of the nocturnal species. I’m particularly fascinated with the Aye-aye. They have a really strange, attenuated third finger which is thin and long – it’s for feeding and grasping. And they’re really just kind of bizarre-looking creatures.
NL: And you’re going to do an installation based on this?
IE: It will be an installation involving large scale paper cuts but I’m not sure about the specific form yet

NL: What’s your relationship like with the scientists that you work with? Do you have an example of working with a scientist where it changed the direction of your work in some way?
IE: That’s a great question. The lemur project is just starting for me so I don’t know if can draw an example from that. But thinking back to some of the research that I’ve done for the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, I’ve done some research in their bird collection and I just keep my ears open when I’m sketching and working in the collection. I hear conversations when people talk about their work and there all kinds of things that come up that are really interesting to me, so always keeping an eye out for interesting topics.

Ingrid and I chatted some more about what a great intellectual and creative adventure it is being the lone artist among a scientific team. We agreed that we are glad that art-science is gaining acceptance so that this kind of adventure is becoming less rare. Thanks so much to Ingrid for sharing her process with us!

Crazy about Maps

Here in the Toe River region in the winter months, our neighbors down in the Celo community publish a calendar called Cabin Fever University, filled with good reasons to get out of the house: it might be a dinner cooked by a Congolese neighbor, a night of French cinema, or a contest for nibbling a slice of cheese into the shape of a country. CFU keeps us entertained. This past weekend, High Cove community member Olga Ronay hosted a CFU event at the Firefly Lodge called “Crazy about Maps.” About ten of us descended upon the Lodge with rolled up maps under our arms, inflated globes with meteorological markings on them, historical maps, links to electronic maps, all things cartographic.

A map of Yugoslavia, a country that no longer exists.

Tania shared this wooden book cover, handmade  in Belgium by her father, decorated with a detailed map of her native Yugoslavia. Larger place names are burned into the wood and smaller ones are labels decoupaged onto the surface. Bodies of water and other large features are painted on. In 1955 when this map was made, wood-burning was a popular craft technique.

On this 18th century map of St. John Island, Patrick points out the location of the Akwamu rebellion of 1733.

Patrick and Emily brought us a map of St. John Island from the 1700s. Residents of St. John for many years, Patrick and Emily had explored every inch of the island. Sweating and bleeding their way through tangled vegetation, venomous spiders, thorny lianas that snag your skin, and no access to food or water, they scouted across the island to locate ruins and learn the island’s history. Committed to leave very little trace, they bushwhacked but did not blaze trails. A reprint of a Danish map used for tax purposes, the map they shared was surprisingly accurate for Patrick and Emily’s outings, which explains why it’s so well worn – it went on a lot of those bushwhacking trips through the Caribbean jungle. Above, Patrick points out the location of the Akwamu Rebellion of 1733, when King June and several other enslaved people from Akwamu (present-day Ghana) led the first successful revolt of enslaved African people.

Map of Virgin Islands with island silhouettes, useful for mariners.

We are fortunate that Patrick and Emily now live up the road from High Cove and visit often to share their stories. They still spend their days walking miles of territory both on and off the roads and trails so they know everyone and everything there is to know about our neck of the woods.


Patrick and Emily have gained a lot of expertise about Mitchell County in a few short years by walking everywhere and talking to everyone, but they can’t match the decades of historical knowledge of Byrne Tinney. Born in West Virginia and educated at Berea College, Byrne has been living in our neck of the woods for the better part of sixty years, at least when he wasn’t teaching university at UNC Chapel Hill, or living in Spain, North Dakota, and points beyond. He shared with us a teaching tool he has used for helping folks understand meteorology, one of his many areas of expertise.

Byrne’s meteorology notes on an inflated globe.

Olga Ronay, AS IF Center board member and one of the primary instigators of the High Cove community, was also the instigator of our little cartographic party. She shared a number of cool electronic maps, including a map of smells in a Manhattan neighborhood and a data map of Brooklyn showing Brooklyn blocks where people sent to prison cost over $ 1 million  (at $30,000 per year, multiplied by x years of the sentence, multiplied by the number of prisoners from the block).

Map of New York smells.

Heat map of arrests in Brooklyn neighborhoods.

We also shared some great online resources including a tragic and data-rich visualization of Napoleon’s invasion of Russia, a free, interactive Mitchell County NC map collection, and a site that uses three-word combinations to help people anywhere in the world remember and locate a GPS point.

With folks from Germany and Yugoslavia, folks who’ve lived in the Carribbean and Spain, and folks who have collectively traveled on most continents, our little party was keenly aware that the map is not the territory. Our conversation turned from maps to our own experiences of places – from swinging bridges of Mitchell County to carrying food and water through the jungle. Maps are a great tool for sharing details from past adventures, and for planning and dreaming about new ones. We geeked out over maps for two hours and we can’t wait to get together again next month.

We crowd in for a better look at this topo map of Mitchell County.

Weaving Research into Creative Writing: Two Events

Writer Cynthia Reeves is the 2018 “Art of the Climate” resident AS IF Center. Her current writing project is a trilogy of linked novellas entitled The Comfort of Water. All three are set on the Svalbard archipelago, where in June 2017 she shared the Arctic Circle Summer Solstice expedition with 31 other artists. Cynthia is pleased to offer two events, co-sponsored by AS IF Center and Toe River Arts — a workshop on using science in creative writing, and a talk about her adventures in the Arctic and how they have inspired her writing.

Both the workshop and the talk will take place on Saturday, March 17 [NOTE NEW DATE] at the Arts Resource Center at Toe River Arts, 269 Oak Avenue, Spruce Pine, upstairs. Events are free of charge, but participants will need to RSVP to reserve a spot, and will be encouraged (but not required) to make a small donation to AS IF Center and Toe River Arts.

The author writes: “That one can ‘live’ on an ice floe—at least for the time the floe remains intact—is fascinating to me. During our trip, we anchored to an ice floe so that I was able to experience what that would be like, the dangers inherent in it, the way it moves without you noticing.”

WORKSHOP: Making the Leap from Fact to Fiction
Saturday, March 17 10:00am-2:30pm with a break for lunch (try Fox & the Fig or DTs Blue Ridge Java). This workshop will focus on finding inspiration for creative writing in “fact” and incorporating research into fiction. We will address questions such as: How do you write authentically about subjects with which you might be only tangentially familiar? Why do certain subjects–climate change and historical events, for example–intrigue you? How can that fascination be put to use in your writing?

Preparation for the workshop will include completing several reading assignments totalling approximately eight hours. The workshop will consist of an informal lecture as well as a writing exercise that will be completed in class and shared with other participants. Due to time constraints, there will not be an opportunity for Cynthia to read the work of participants beforehand.

Minimum 8 participants / Maximum 12
Workshop registration closes March 10

To apply, write a brief (250-300 word) essay about why you are interested in the workshop, and email to us by March 10.

TALK: Of Ice Floes, Whale Bones, and Abandoned Mines: Close Encounters from the Arctic Circle Summer Solstice Expedition
Saturday, March 17, 4:00pm-5:00pm

This talk will reflect the ways in which travel and research inspire Cynthia’s work. She will share photos and personal experiences from her Arctic Circle residency aboard the schooner Antigua, and will read from her work-in-progress inspired by encounters from that residency. One impetus from her trip that shaped her project were serendipitous comments from her fellow artist-shipmates as they wound down their adventure. They would say: This is our “last landing,” our “last beach,” and “our last glacier.” The idea of there being a “last glacier” jogged something in her mind—tying the idea of climate change and its potential impacts directly to her work. The stunning and otherworldly beauty of the Arctic landscape was also a source of inspiration, especially contemplating what would be lost if that landscape continues to be compromised.

RSVP by email to save a spot.

Turkey Tail or False Turkey Tail?

On a walkabout with some folks from the High Cove community yesterday, we ran across some beautiful shelf fungi. I knew they were either Turkey Tail or False Turkey Tail. For years I’ve been wondering how to tell the difference and I finally just learned how to ID them. Can you tell which species it is? Here are your clues:


The art-science conversation: two resources for deep reflection

What do we mean when we say “art-science?”

Should we encourage more of it? Can the practice of art-science, or “STEAM,” improve our schools? Since art and science have different goals and different approaches, how should we evaluate art-science? How can we level the playing field between art and science, giving each equal respect and opportunities for support? Why don’t the contributions of art to science mirror the contributions of science to art? Can we change that? Should we?

There is a growing recognition that artists and scientists alike seek truths in the world, explore new territory, build on past work, observe with the senses, generate new tools and techniques, solve problems, often collaborate, and use creativity. In recent years, many new initiatives have emerged to re-integrate art with science. However, there are probably as many ways to define art-science as there are practitioners of it. So how do we talk to each other about what we’re doing?

Two recent symposia, both available online, offer opportunities for deep engagement in this conversation. Below are links to the recorded discussions. There’s a lot of rich material worth exploring, and I hope you reflect on them and leave your comments here.

I will close with a challenge:  Note that a lot of us elephants in the room are white… what are we going to do about that?

Strange Attractors: Art, Science, and the Question of Convergence


Art & Science: The Two Cultures Converging 

AS IF Center’s first resident: Cynthia Reeves

The Art of the Climate resident has been chosen, and is also AS IF Center’s first official resident. Through a competitive process, we selected Cynthia Reeves, a writer whose work has appeared in a wide array of journals and anthologies. She has won numerous honors, including Miami University Press’s Novella Prize (2007) for Badlands; several Pushcart Prize nominations; and prizes in Columbia’s Fiction Contest, the 2006 and 2008 Quarter After Eight Short Prose Contests, New Millennium’s Short Short Fiction Contest, and Potomac Review’s Fiction Contest. She has also been awarded residencies to Vermont Studio Center and the 2017 Arctic Circle Summer Solstice Expedition to Svalbard.

Cynthia Reeves at Svalbard. Photo by Carleen Sheehan.

Cynthia’s work most often arises in the intersection between history and science. She seeks to portray how the political and the external impinge upon the personal. Often that fresh angle comes through locating the work in the lives of ordinary people whose stories have been lost or ignored, with the goal of enlarging our engagement with wider, unfamiliar worlds. A graduate of Warren Wilson’s MFA program, Cynthia has taught in the creative writing programs at Rosemont College and Bryn Mawr College.


What will Cynthia be doing at AS IF Center?
Cynthia’s current writing project is a trilogy of linked novellas entitled The Comfort of Water. All three are set on the Svalbard archipelago, where in June 2017 she shared the Arctic Circle Summer Solstice expedition with 31 other artists. The first novella, The Last Whaler, concerns a Norwegian couple—a beluga whaler and his botanist wife—stranded on Spitsbergen during the winter of 1935-36. Among other themes, it explores the effect of humans on the environment and the protagonist’s changing attitudes toward harvesting whales. The second, The Last Glacier, is a fairy tale set in a parallel contemporary world told from the point of view of the glacier. Its intention is to describe a world that could be lost without significant intervention to slow down the loss of ice at the poles. The third, The Last Eden, a post-apocalyptic novella set in the near future, centers on two characters—a female botanist and a hominin creature—confronted with a cataclysmic event: the sudden massive calving of an ice shelf that isolates them in an Arctic cave. Each has knowledge of the past but no way to access or employ that knowledge. What would become of their desire to reclaim a world already gone? What is the potential for a relationship, for love, to redefine the possible even in the most extreme conditions?


This writing project poses two major challenges: to create three very different, authentic worlds, and to portray the geo-political and scientific context in which each story is set. During the residency, Cynthia will continue writing the novellas while also collaborating with scientists at NCEI—especially botanists and glaciologists—to more fully understand the implications of climate change on plants and ice and to supplement her years of Arctic research.


We look forward to Cynthia’s visit.

Sara Rich visit to AS IF Center – all about dendroprovenancing

Last weekend AS IF Center hosted Dr. Sara Rich, Lecturer in Art History at Appalachian State University. Sara is a certified diver, a scholar of Arabic and Hebrew, versed in the science of dendrology, and author of Cedar Forests, Cedar Ships: Allure, Lore, and Metaphor in the Mediterranean Near East. Her work involves dendroprovenancing – using dendrochronology to date the wood in shipwrecks. Each year, the earth’s climate leaves a signature of width in tree rings – the overall pattern of thinner and thicker rings can be read like a bar code that dates the tree from which the wood was cut.

AS IF Center breakfast at the Yellow House

Sara came to AS IF to work on a fiction project. We shared a breakfast with Olga Ronay, AS IF Advisory Board member and one of the founding partners of High Cove (where AS IF Center is located), John Moore, woodcarver and former professor of Classics at Brown University and New College, and Byrne Tinney, former UNC faculty member in Spanish, meteorology expert, and longtime resident of the area. Several other High Cove community members had a chance to meet with Sara as well. We shared pizza, hiked, enjoyed a fire at the Lodge, added “dendroprovenancing” to our vocabulary, and talked about ancient history, Arabic and Hebrew language, world travels, and alternative narrative forms for telling the stories of science.

At Sara’s visit, we were envisioning a way to screen off the Yellow House residents’ quarters and studio from the rest of the house, to create more privacy for residents to work. We were inspired with the idea of making a folding privacy screen, collaged with drawings, writings, collections and other works from AS IF visitors. Sara left us with the first element for this project, seen below: a study for a painting of a the multibeam echosounder imaging of the wrecked 16th c. galleon in the Eo Estuary in Ribadeo, Galicia, Spain. Thanks for your visit, Sara – we hope you’ll join us again!

High Cove masala

AS IF Center has been a seed of an idea for many years, drawing on the nutrients of the growing community of art-science, then floating around on the wind for a bit, looking for the right place to take root. We have set down roots in the remote mountains of North Carolina for many reasons, some of them not so surprising: the rich diversity of flora and fauna, world-class geological sites, dark skies for astronomy, and the abundance of artists that buzz around Penland School of Crafts, just up the road. Nearby Asheville, known for its creative environment, also hosts some excellent but lesser-known science institutions. For example, the National Centers for Environmental Information is the headquarters for the nation’s climate data, and the Southern Research Station of the US Forest Service does important work to study how our forests adapt to human impacts.

But there is another reason to be here, and that is the surprisingly cosmopolitan community that is High Cove, where AS IF Center is located.

High Cove is a magnet for visitors from all corners. On a recent night in May, we had a delightful gathering with Gary Martin, who had travelled from Morocco. Gary, an ethnobotanist who wrote a textbook on Ethnobotany, directs the Global Diversity Foundation for preserving the biological and cultural diversity of the planet. At our gathering, a dozen of us mingled, nibbled on local goat cheese and just-picked ramps, sipped some wine, then I asked Gary to tell us about his work. He pulled out a few dozen plastic bags and spread them on the coffee table, and suddenly it looked like a drug bust. What were all these things?

bags of spices on the table

Looks like a drug bust… but it’s just spices aplenty

He opened one bag, a potpourri that included ingredients from all the other bags. He rolled down its edges and offered it to me.  I stuck my nose down into the bag and inhaled. I was transported to a spice market in Morocco, with whiffs of cardamom, cinnamon, anise, pepper, and things I didn’t recognize. My olfactory world burst into complex chord: mineral, herbal, salty, sweet, bitter, sour, umami, medicinal, fruity, woody, nutty… with overtones and undertones, foretastes and aftertastes, like a well-aged, complex wine.

We focused on the ingredients one at a time. Gary passed around a bag of Melegueta pepper, or “grains of paradise.” A member of  Zingiberaceae, or ginger family, the Afromomum melegueta makes seeds which sting the tongue, then reveal clean, citrusy, peppery clouds of flavor that entertain the nose and throat, and fill the head. There were spices that came from every part of a plant. Delicate red threads of the finest saffron in the world, highly valued stamens of the Crocus sativus. Golden, leathery-looking bits of mace, the fleshy aril covering the nutmeg in the Myristica fragrans tree. Orris root,  the rhizome of Iris pallida, used as a fixative to bind  flavors together.

samples of mace in a bag

Mace, the fleshy aril that covers the nutmeg.

an variety of spices in a bag

Take a whiff – incredible aromas.







One highlight of the evening was passing around a small, round seed about the size of a peppercorn, with a smooth woody surface the color of rosewood. It was a guessing game. We scratched and sniffed. One said, “Cloves?” Another asserted: “Cardamom! No, wait. Cinnamon?” And “Hmm… it has a spicy bite, like ginger-ish. But with a deeper note, like maybe nutmeg?” Then we realized, aha. Allspice! Indeed, that is where the name comes from. From Jamaica, allspice, or Pimenta dioica, has flavors reminiscent of so many of these spices.

We expect variety in cities. I have lived in three cities and travelled to a dozen more in different parts of the world. But it wasn’t until I moved to this remote location in the mountains of North Carolina that I had the privilege of learning about ethnobotany from a guy who wrote a textbook on it. Just a few days prior to that olfactory feast of spices, I was at a different kind of feast: my first Russian Orthodox Easter breakfast, eating pascha and drinking tea out of glasses with silver podstakannik, thanks to a Russian artist living at High Cove.


Russian Orthodox Easter pascha and eggs


Russian tea glass








High Cove has had visitors from Burundi, Switzerland, Austria, Morocco, India, and from all over the US. Folks who live here and those who visit have generally travelled widely, studied deeply, and do interesting work in the arts, the sciences, academia, engineering, journalism, and other fields. High Cove residents include a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist / ceramic artist; a physicist / musician;  a Stanford University classics professor / woodworker; a radio engineer / meteorologist / Spanish professor. Incredibly, when I arrived, there was already another artist / scientist here, who became a friend and partner in crime.

Our feasts of culinary and olfactory delights are a common occurrence here, as are the equally intriguing curries of stimulating conversation. We relish our “sobremesa” (Spanish for “around the table”), that time of lingering after a meal to enjoy stories, laughter, music, learning, and companionship. It is this rich masala of bright minds, delightful conversations, creative work, and adventurous eating, and  that brought AS IF Center to this place.

The world comes to High Cove. We hope you will, too.